Government document provides compelling evidence that Justin Trudeau’s August 26, 2015 fundraiser violated the Lobbying Act and the Canada Elections Act

Two days before Justin Trudeau attended Barry and Honey Sherman’s August 26, 2015 election campaign fundraiser Apotex registered to lobby the Government of Canada. The date of Apotex registering to lobby the Government of Canada was during the ongoing 2015 federal election campaign. Apotex registering to lobby the Government of Canada during an election campaign and 2 days before Apotex’s head hosted an election campaign fundraiser for election candidate Justin Trudeau informs Canadians that Apotex was seeking to influence Justin Trudeau in the performance of his duties and functions as a member of the House of Commons if he were to be elected.

The Government of Canada’s “Registry of Lobbyists” report confirms that on August 24, 2015 Apotex registered to lobby the Trudeau government.

Stated purpose of registering to lobby the Government of Canada:

The lobbyist has arranged or expects to arrange one or more meetings on behalf of the client between a public office holder and any other person in the course of this undertaking.

Subject matter:

Legislation relating to patented medicines — Patented Medicines (Notice of Compliance) Regulations — provisional nature of judicial determinations of proceedings brought by first persons; inadequacy of section 8 damages.

The “Registry of Lobbyists” information provides compelling evidence that Justin Trudeau attending Barry and Honey Sherman’s August 26, 2015 election campaign fundraiser violated the Lobbying Act and the Canada Elections Act – Accepting a prohibited gift or other advantage.

Prohibition

477.9 (1) No candidate shall accept any gift or other advantage that might reasonably be seen to have been given to influence them in the performance of their duties and functions as a member of the House of Commons if the candidate were to be elected, during the period that

(a) begins on the day on which they are deemed to have become a candidate; and

gift or other advantage means

(a) an amount of money if there is no obligation to repay it; and

(b) a service or property, or the use of property or money, that is provided without charge or at less than its commercial value.

Corrupt practice

(2) Every person is guilty of an offence that is a corrupt practice who

(h.01) being a candidate, knowingly contravenes subsection 477.9(1) (accepting prohibited gift or other advantage);

Consequences of illegal, corrupt practices

(3) Any person who is convicted of having committed an offence that is an illegal practice or a corrupt practice under this Act shall, in addition to any other punishment for that offence prescribed by this Act, in the case of an illegal practice, during the next five years or, in the case of a corrupt practice, during the next seven years, after the date of their being so convicted, not be entitled to

(a) be elected to or sit in the House of Commons; or

Apotex registered to lobby the Government of Canada 3 days after Barry Sherman reported that he had meet privately with 2015 federal election campaign candidate Justin Trudeau. The private meeting between Justin Trudeau and Barry Sherman (Apotex) was made public a few days before Barry Sherman hosted Justin Trudeau’s August 26, 2015 fundraiser.

“Serman said he spent an hour with Trudeau last week, discussing various issues” The Canadian Jewish News (CJN), August 21, 2015

Barry Sherman meeting and “discussing various issues” with 2015 election campaign candidate Justin Trudeau before the Aug 26, 2015 election campaign fundraiser and Apotex registering to lobby the incoming Government of Canada 2 days before the Aug 26, 2015 election campaign fundraiser meant Justin Trudeau violated the Lobbying Act and the Canada Elections Act – accepting prohibited gift or other advantage. Justin Trudeau violated both the Lobbying Act and the Canada Elections Act because the meeting before the August 26, 2015 election campaign fundraiser provided an opportunity to further the private interests of 2015 election candidate Justin Trudeau & registered lobbyist Barry Sherman (Apotex).

“There is basis to conclude that the private interests of (REDACTED) were advanced to a high degree, and that a sense of obligation was created by Mr. Sherman’s contribution to the 2015 election campaigns,” wrote McIntosh, in a recommendation to open a full investigation into the case.

“There is basis to conclude that Mr. Sherman is in breach of  the Lobbyists’ Code of Conduct as a consequence of his involvement in the organization of a fundraising event for the (Liberal Party),” McIntosh wrote on Jan. 18, 2017.

Lobbying Commissioner Karen Shepherd checked the box, “I agree,” the same day.

The Government of Canada document also provides the primary motive for the targeted murders of Justin Trudeau’s August 26, 2015 election campaign fundraisers Barry and Honey Sherman.

Canada Elections Act

Corrupt practice

(2) Every person is guilty of an offence that is a corrupt practice who

(h.01) being a candidate, knowingly contravenes subsection 477.9(1) (accepting prohibited gift or other advantage);

Consequences of illegal, corrupt practices

(3) Any person who is convicted of having committed an offence that is an illegal practice or a corrupt practice under this Act shall, … not be entitled to

(a) be elected to or sit in the House of Commons

“Despite the available penalties under the current act, no one has ever been charged, or convicted of an offence under the Lobbying Act” Lobbying Commissioner Karen Shepherd @ ETHI Committee Meeting

Barry Sherman faced no severe punitive measures for hosting Justin Trudeau’s August 26, 2015 election campaign fundraiser. Lobbyist Barry Sherman (Apotex) had a right to communicate with elected government officials. However, Justin Trudeau faced severe punitive measures because of the RCMP investigation of the August 26, 2015 election campaign fundraiser. A conviction for accepting the prohibited gift or other advantage meant Justin Trudeau would have forfeited/lost his job. Justin Trudeau wouldn’t be Prime Minister of Canada today or throughout COVID-19. German collaborator Chrystia Freeland wouldn’t be Deputy Prime Minister or the Finance Minister either.