Drug trafficker turned RCMP informant Peter Alan Griffon had motive to commit Nova Scotia mass murders

Convicted drug trafficker turned RCMP informant, Peter Alan Griffon had motive, means and opportunity to commit the Nova Scotia mass murders.

  • Motive – theft of the 1/2 a million dollars that Grabriel Wortman picked up on March 30, 2020 for a RCMP drug Op.

RCMP claim the money was destroyed in a fire at Gabriel Wortman’s home.

  • Means – Peter Alan Griffon was arrested and charged by Alberta’s Alert for possession and careless use of numerous prohibited weapons. Peter Alan Griffon had the means to obtain more weapons to commit the Nova Scotia mass murders. Drug trafficking is defined as organized crime – “a group of three or more people whose purpose is the commission of one or more serious offences that would likely result in the direct or indirect receipt of a material benefit, including a financial benefit, by the group.” When Peter Alan Griffon was arrested in 2014 three other drug trafficking associates were arrested too. Where were they at the time of the mass murders.

Peter Alan Griffon’s Parole Board of Canada review provides the most compelling evidence that RCMP informant Peter Alan Griffon is the Nova Scotia mass murderer.

In the assessment of risk, the Board first looks to your index offences of Possession of Schedule I/II Substance for Purpose of Trafficking, Unauthorized Possession Prohibited/Restricted Weapon, Fail to Comply with Condition of Undertaking/Recognizance, and Unauthorized Possession of Firearm. Your sentence was in excess of six years, but with remand time considered, it translated into two years, nine months and eight days.

To be more specific on how you incurred the index offences, you became a person of interest to police who, in December 2014, were investigating a known Security Threat Group (STG), namely La Familia with ties to MS-13. Your vehicle was stopped, and a search uncovered a significant amount of cocaine, a considerable amount of cash and an extendable baton. This seizure resulted in a search of your residence, a converted warehouse of sorts. Again, considerable drugs and trafficking/production paraphernalia and money was seized. Further aggravating in the assessment of risk is the fact numerous weapons, mostly high powered and/or converted, were seized. File information would certainly suggest that these weapons were directly related to the
drug trade, be it for protection and/or enforcement purposes. You readily admitted to working for a cocaine distribution operation and that your job was to store, process, distribute, and transport cocaine to traffickers.

Statement from Nova Scotia RCMP provides compelling evidence that Peter Alan Griffon was a RCMP informant:

Some of the information that was unsealed and released from the ITOs on July 27, 2020, is from one individual who was interviewed and provided information which described the gunman as someone who was involved in the importation and trafficking of illicit drugs and firearms.

As Part of H-Strong, investigators have conducted close to 700 witness interviews and only this one witness has come forward with information that the gunman was actively and recently involved in the importation and trafficking of illegal drugs. No other persons interviewed of the close to 700, including those closest to the gunman, have provided similar information that proves the gunman was an illegal drug smuggler and or drug trafficker.

The investigation has not uncovered any evidence that the gunman was involved in organized crime. Outside of one uncorroborated statement, the remainder of witness interviews have not revealed any corroborated or actionable information that the gunman was involved in organized importation or sale of illegal drugs with any other single person or that the gunman was part of any type of criminal organization or organized crime group.

Peter Alan Griffon’s Parole Board of Canada review provides material evidence to support the assertion that Peter Alan Griffon was a RCMP informant.

“You would later advise your parole officer that you had misled police and lied outright to your parole officer when first contacted and queried about knowledge of the shooting suspect.”

The Parole Board of Canada review statement provides material evidence that Peter Alan Griffon framed Gabriel Wortman by giving RCMP information that he knew was absolutely false. Peter Alan Griffon is the one and only person who provided the RCMP with information which described Gabriel Wortman as someone who was involved in the importation and trafficking of illicit drugs and firearms.

The Parole Board of Canada review also explains Peter Alan Griffon’s motive for framing Gabriel Wortman for the Nova Scotia mass murders and arsons April 18-19, 2020.

“You shared that your (cocaine) addiction at one point reached using over $1000 worth per day. That level of use was not sustainable on a legitimate income. In the pursuit of drugs, you met the individual that police connected to a notorious STG. Given the opportunity to deliver drugs for cash and drug access, the offer was quickly accepted”

Peter Alan Griffon’s index of offences: Possession of Schedule I/II Substance for Purpose of Trafficking, Unauthorized Possession Prohibited/Restricted Weapon, Fail to Comply with Condition of Undertaking/Recognizance, and Unauthorized Possession of Firearm. Supporting the allegation that Peter Alan Griffon is a prime suspect in the Nova Scotia mass murders is the fact Griffon was charged and convicted of Unauthorized Possession Prohibited/Restricted Weapon. After his arrest in 2014 “numerous weapons, mostly high powered and/or converted were seized”. 

2014 CBC report informed readers what type of weapons were seized by ALERT:

Peter Alan Griffon is the one person who had motive to target and kill 2 correctional officers April 18-19, 2020. Griffon served time in a NS prison (Correctional Service of Canada facility) for drug trafficking and firearm offences. Note: “Parole Officers work either within a correctional facility or in the community.” Correctional Services Canada

Griffon also had motive to target anyone who might provide RCMP or his parole officer with information that Griffon was trafficking in drugs while on parole. Griffon was out on parole at the time of the mass murders. Anyone who bought drugs from or sold drugs to Peter Alan Griffon would be a potential target. Government of Canada website informs you why:

Conditions of release

Standard Conditions

All offenders released on conditional release must abide by a set of standard conditions. These include reporting to a parole officer, obeying the law and keeping the peace, not owning or possessing a weapon, and reporting any change in their family, domestic or financial situation to their parole officer.

Special Conditions

The Parole Board may also impose any special conditions it considers reasonable and necessary to further manage an offender’s risk in the community, such as to abstain from the use of drugs or alcohol.

Peter Alan Griffon’s parole conditions:

The evidence implicates drug trafficker turned RCMP informant Peter Alan Griffon as the prime suspect for the Nova Scotia mass murders. When Peter Alan Griffon was arrested by Alberta Law Enforcement Response Team (ALERT) in December 2014 a variety of firearms and weapons were seized, including:

  • Two .22 caliber rifles, one equipped with a silencer;
  • .44 caliber Desert Eagle handgun;
  • Sawed-off shotgun;
  • Thousands of rounds of ammunition;
  • Body armour vests.

Edmonton Police Service and the RCMP laid 9 charges against Peter Alan Griffon in 2014:

  • Possession for the purpose of trafficking (x 2);
  • Possession of a loaded prohibited firearm;
  • Unauthorized possession of a firearm;
  • Careless use of a firearm (x 5).

Statement by ALERT, an integrated team consisting of Edmonton Police Service and RCMP members when Peter Alan Griffon was arrested and later convicted of drug trafficking and weapons offences:

“The group is called La Familia & their reputation includes bloodshed & intimidation. La Familia, or the The Family, is described as an international support arm for the Mexican drug cartels and has strong ties to El Salvador gang Mara Salvatrucha, also known as MS-13.”

If Peter Alan Griffon is the Nova Scotia mass murderer why hasn’t he been charged? Because if he was a RCMP informant he can claim immunity from prosecution.

Public Proseution Service of Canada, Immunity Agreement

Introduction

Those who have violated the law should be held accountable for their crimes. However, some crimes can be proved only by the testimony or cooperation of individuals who are implicated in the same crime or in some other criminal activity and who seek immunity from prosecution in exchange for their testimony and/or their cooperation with the police.

While the cooperation of these individuals has been recognized as a very powerful tool in the battle against crime, it brings with it the very real risk that individuals will falsely accuse others and/or minimize their own culpability in the hope of securing immunity. Great care therefore must be taken in dealing with individuals seeking immunity.

.2. Immunity from future prosecutions

The DPP is also entitled to provide an assurance of immunity against future prosecution for crimes that the information-provider is known to have already committed, but for which no charges have yet been laid

However, charges can still be laid if Peter Alan Griffon was a RCMP agent at the time of the Nova Scotia mass murders. There is evidence that Gabriel Wortman obtained 1\2 million dollars from the RCMP for a RCMP Op on March 30, 2020. The RCMP Op involved convicted drug trafficker Peter Alan Griffon. Griffon arranged a drug buy for the RCMP using the money Gabriel Wortman obtained from the RCMP on March 30, 2020. Fintrac paperwork for the $475,000 transfer to Gabriel Wortman will confirm it.

“According to a source close to the police investigation the money came from CIBC Intria, a subsidiary of the chartered bank that handles currency transactions.”

“Sources in both banking and the RCMP say the transaction is consistent with how the RCMP funnels money to its confidential informants and agents, and is not an option available to private banking customers.” Macleans

In that case, Peter Alan Griffon has no immunity from prosecution because he was an agent acting on the direction of the RCMP to go “into the field” to participate in the illegal transaction in some way.

Public Proseution Service of Canada states:

8. Situations Where the Privilege Might Not Apply

There are situations where informer privilege does not apply, where the information-provider is a police agent or agent provocateur, when the privilege has been waived, or where a person provides information to the police in the absence of a promise or guarantee of confidentiality, either express or implied. In these situations, the information-provider does not have (or, in the case of waiver, no longer has) informer status.

a) Distinguishing Agents from Informers

One of the most difficult problems in this area is determining when the privilege applies to the actions of persons cooperating with the police. Informer privilege does not apply when the information-provider is characterized as a “police agent” or “agent provocateur,” rather than an “informer.”

A helpful explanation of the distinction between informers and agents is found in the Ontario Court of Appeal’s decision in R v Babes:

In general terms, the distinction between an informer and an agent is that an informer merely furnishes information to the police and an agent acts on the direction of the police and goes “into the field” to participate in the illegal transaction in some way. The identity of an informer is protected by a strong privilege and, accordingly, is not disclosable, subject to the innocence at stake exception. The identity of an agent is disclosable.

Generally speaking, passive observers to criminal activities will be considered informers. In contrast, individuals who participate in the criminal activities under investigation as a result of being directed by the police will generally be considered police agents or agents provocateurs. A person may have dual status as a confidential informer and police agent in relation to separate investigations or targets.

Despite all the evidence that implicates RCMP asset Peter Alan Griffon for the Nova Scotia mass murders he will likely never be charged or prosecuted because extremely corrupt PM/MP Justin Trudeau used the mass murders to obtain legislation banning assault rifles, pursuant to and furtherance of a UN agenda.

Dashcam video of the scene where RCMP Cst. Heidi Stevenson was killed provides material evidence that RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki was pressured by Justin Trudeau to falsely claim Gabriel Wortman used assault rifles to commit the mass murders on April 18-19 2020. Justin Trudeau pressured RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki to fabricate evidence to further the UN’s agenda of banning assault rifles in Canada.

A screenshot from a dashcam video shows RCMP ERT officers firing assault rifles. A person RCMP identified as Gabriel Wortman was videotaped by a passing motorist fleeing the scene on foot but he wasn’t videotaped carrying an assault rifle.

The above screenshot from a dashcam provides material evidence that RCMP Cst. Heidi Stevenson was killed by friendly fire and RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki covered it up by claiming Gabriel Wortman had used assault rifles to commit the Nova Scotia mass murders. The position of RCMP Cst. Heidi Stevenson’s body on the ground and RCMP ERT officer firing assault rifles in the direction of her RCMP cruiser supports the friendly fire assertion.

This screenshot and other video images provides evidence that the weapons RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki claimed Gabriel Wortman used in the Nova Scotia shootings were actually used and fired by RCMP ERT officers at the scene where RCMP Cst Heidi Stevenson was killed. RCMP ERT members firing their Colt Carbines was captured by RCMP dashcam and by a motorist’s cell phone video. RCMP ERT officers were video taped carrying a Colt Carbine while he climbed over a guardrail in front of RCMP Cst. Heidi Stevenson’s cruiser.

The 2 RCMP cruisers were set on fire to destroy material evidence that could and would implicate the RCMP and their involvement in the Nova Scotia mass murders and the killing of RCMP officer Cst. Heidi Stevenson.